Dr. Michael Lacey

Michael Lacey is a professor of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He became a faculty member there in 1996, beginning a research and teaching career that has won him awards from the Guggenheim and Simons Foundations. Read more: Michael Lacey |Math Alliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

He has directed training grants from the National Science Foundation that supported many students in undergraduate, graduate, and post doctorate programs. He has actively mentored students in undergraduate programs who’ve gone on to prominent graduate programs, PhD students who found roles in academia and industry, and over ten post doctorate students.

Dr. Lacey studied for his PhD in Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and received it in 1987 while being mentored by Walter Phillip. He went on to positions at Louisiana State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. At UNC, he and Dr. Phillip published a proof of the central limit theorem. He was at Indiana University between 1989 and 1996.

While there he accepted a National Science Foundation fellowship and used it to study the bilinear Hilbert transform. In 1996 he and Christoph Thiele worked together to solve a conjecture put forward by Alberto Calderon that won them the Salem Prize.

Since 1996, Dr. Lacey has been at Georgia Institute of Technology. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2004 for work he did with Xiaochun Li, and in 2012 he also became a fellow with the American Mathematical Society.

Michael Lacey has published research on subjects such as iterated logarithms, the central limit theorem, Ergodic averages on circles, the bilinear Hilbert transform, and the solution of a Kato Square Root Problem.